past
Selected Works
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Warhead, 2014. PLA polymer and acrylic, 45 x 24 x 30 in.

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Mining Arm, 2014. PLA Polymer and acrylic, 50 x 54 x 12 in.

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Vertebral Space Elevator, 2013. PLA Polymer and acrylic, 55 x 30 x 30 in.

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Centralia Habitat: Up, 2014. Acrylic on muslin, 60 x 76 in.

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Centralia Habitat: Circle, 2014. Acrylic on muslin, 65 x 75.5 in.

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Centralia Habitat: Muscle, 2014. Acrylic on muslin, 62.5 x 44.5 in. 

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Cuevitas, Texas, 2013. Acrylic on muslin, 62 x 46 in.

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Space Elevator Study: Orbit, 2015. Archival pigment print and watercolor on paper, 24 x 13 in.

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Arm Study: Gradient, 2015. Archival pigment print and watercolor on paper, 24 x 13 in.

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Robot Study in Chartreuse, 2015. Archival pigment print and waterclor on paper, 24 x 51 in.

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Warhead Study: Sunrise, 2015. Archival pigment print and watercolor on paper, 24 1/4 x 24 in.

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Arm Study: Constructions, 2015. Archival pigment print and water on paper, 25 x 24 in.

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Space Elevator Study: Cross-section, 2015. Archival pigment print and watercolor on paper, 24 x 13 in.

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Space Elevator Study: Orbit, 2015. Archival pigment print and watercolor on paper, 24 x 13 in.

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Warhead Study: Rotation, 2015. Archival pigment print and watercolor on paper, 24 x 13 in.

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Robot Study in Pink, 2015. Archival pigment print and watercolor on paper, 24 x 36 in.

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Warhead Study: Slices, 2015. Archival pigment print and watercolor on paper, 13 1/4 x 24 in.

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Installation images
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Videos

Centralia Habitat by Micah Ganske with music by Ravaged Hearts

Press Release

101/EXHIBIT proudly presents The Future is Always Tomorrow, a solo exhibition from artist Micah Ganske. Paintings and sculptures from Ganske’s most recent series comprise the exhibition, in which the artist explores possible future forms of human society and habitation. The exhibition also includes Ganske’s new video Centralia Habitat, which tours a future space colony conceived by the artist.

 

The opening reception will be held on Saturday, January 17th from 7-9pm, at 101/EXHIBIT’s Hollywood location at 6205 Santa Monica Blvd.

 

The paintings in The Future is Always Tomorrow, Ganske’s first solo exhibition in Los Angeles, envision a space habitat. Yet this future home does not depict the utopian paradises rendered by 1970s NASA concept artists, who depicted technological Arcadias of lush valleys, whitewashed homes, and smiling affluent whites.

 

Ganske instead posits a future infrastructure where technology moves through cycles of innovation and obsolescence, and access to technology depends on location and class status—as it does today. He combines fantastical technologies with images drawn from the mining town of Centralia, Pennsylvania, a town abandoned following an underground coal fire that started in 1962 and continues to this day. Once a thriving borough on account of the coal industry, Centralia is now a ghost town felled by the very technology that once supported its population. Ganske predicts analogous setbacks within the history of the distant future, that we will always be replacing old technologies with new ones, and that any human habitat ultimately becomes a collage of time periods.

 

Just as Ganske’s paintings coalesce the realities of the present with future visions, so too do his new sculptures. These sculptures envision another aspect of humanity’s future: a fleet of spacecraft designed for human exploration of distant worlds. Based on the human form, Ganske designed each sculpture as a specific body part and exploratory function; for example, his “arm sculpture” is a mining vessel equipped with drilling tools and storage space for extraterrestrial ores.

 

Ganske’s vision is a cautious optimism, one excited about the technology of the future while prepared for some bumps along the way. “The future is always tomorrow,” he says, “and there are always improvements to be made.”

 

Micah Ganske works and lives in Queens, New York. His work offers a meditation on the relationship between our present and its possible futures. He received his BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2002 and a Post-Baccalaureate certificate from the Maryland Institute College of Art in 2003. In 2005 he received his MFA in painting from the Yale School of Art. In October 2007 Deitch Projects exhibited Ganske's first solo exhibition, Pictures Last Longer. In 2011 Ganske exhibited works from Tomorrow Land at Tribeca’s RH Gallery. Ganske was also a 2012 Fellow in Painting from the New York Foundation for the Arts. Most recently Ganske was an artist-in-residence at Pioneer Works Center for Art and Innovation in Brooklyn, NY.

Selected Press
LA Times

Sharon Mizota from the LA Times reviews Micah's exhibition The Future is Always Tomorrow

Yay LA

Painter Micah Ganske discusses his artistic visions for the World of Tommorow in advance of his solo show at 101/EXHIBIT.

By Andrea Steedman-Gillanders

Artsy Editorial

Micah Ganske's Solo show The Future is Always Tomorrow covered by Anna Furman. 

Widewalls

Widewalls covers Micah Ganske's upcoming exhibition The Future is Always Tomorrow. The exhibit will be opening on January 17th, 2015 at our 6205 Santa Monica Blvd location.

What's Up Miami

WUM NEWS L.A. "Centralia Habitat" by Micah Ganske, Exploring Future Forms of Human Society

Artists in this exhibition
Location & Contact

668 NORTH LA PEER DRIVE
LOS ANGELES, CA 90069

TELEPHONE 310-659-9668
HOURS: TUES - SAT 10AM - 6PM
INFO@101EXHIBIT.COM

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